klarmanHarvard Law Professor Michael Klarman on “The Degradation of American Democracy—And the Court”


Prof. Klarman, a constitutional scholar, will speak on the degradation of American democracy, the courts' contributions to that degradation, and possible remedial steps that might be taken.


Wednesday, May 5, 2021 @ 3:30PM Pacific Time (5:30PM Central Time)
Virtual Event via Zoom (details sent after registration)


Click here for more details and to register now!
This event is being hosted by the Harvard Club of Minnesota.

Cost: No charge, registration required
Contact: Jim Richardson, james_p_richardson@msn.com

Professor Klarman's talk is based on his Harvard Law Review article.

Professor Michael J. Klarman is the Kirkland & Ellis Professor at Harvard Law School, where he joined the faculty in 2008.  He received his B.A. and M.A. (political theory) from the University of Pennsylvania in 1980, his J.D. from Stanford Law School in 1983, and his D. Phil. in legal history from the University of Oxford (1988), where he was a Marshall Scholar.  After law school, Professor Klarman clerked for the Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit (1983-84).  He joined the faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law in 1987 and served there until 2008 as the James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law and Professor of History.

Klarman has also served as the Ralph S. Tyler, Jr., Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School, Distinguished Visiting Lee Professor of Law at the Marshall Wythe School of Law at the College of William & Mary, Visiting Professor at Stanford Law School, and Visiting Professor at Yale Law School.

Klarman has won numerous awards for his teaching and scholarship, which are primarily in the areas of Constitutional Law and Constitutional History.  In 2009 he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.

Klarman’s first book, From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality, was published by Oxford University Press in 2004 and received the 2005 Bancroft Prize in History.  He published two books in the summer of 2007, also with Oxford University Press: Brown v. Board of Education and the Civil Rights Movement and Unfinished Business: Racial Equality in American History, which is part of Oxford’s Inalienable Rights series.  In 2012, he published From the Closet to the Altar: Courts, Backlash, and the Struggle for Same-Sex Marriage. He is currently working on a revisionist history of the Founding.

When:

3:30PM - 4:30PM Wed 5 May 2021 ( Timezone: Pacific )

Virtual Event Instructions: